Research

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Schools can help teach students the importance of eating healthier by making eating healthy fun and easy to do. CDC’s new research briefs on Making Time for School Lunch and Nutrition Education in U.S. Schools give information on the importance of students having adequate time to eat lunch while at school and how nutrition education can help students establish healthy eating behaviors.

Both resources include a downloadable, easy-to-read flyer that can be shared with educators and advocates.

Click here for the “Making Time for School Lunch” research brief

Click here for the “Nutrition Education in U.S. Schools research brief

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Recently, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine held a workshop that explored challenges and opportunities for health sector actors that engage with faith-based health assets. The workshop provided an overview of faith-based assets in communities and their relationship to population health and the work of health improvement; highlighted areas where faith-based health assets are using evidence to inform their work and demonstrating effectiveness in improving health outcomes; provided examples of effective partnerships involving faith-based health assets; and shared lessons learned from working with faith-based assets that could contribute toward principles for engagement for health care organizations and public health agencies.

Click here to read the report

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Recognizing the bidirectional relationship between health and educational success, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Roundtable on Population Health Improvement held a public workshop in Oakland California, featuring presentations that exemplified the relationship between the health and education sectors, and shared examples of public health interventions and activities in schools that support school success.

Click here to read the proceedings of the workshop.

 

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The Roundtable on Obesity Solutions of the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, recently held a public workshop, A Health Equity Approach to Obesity Efforts, in Washington, DC. The workshop explored the history of health equity issues in demographic groups that have above-average obesity risk, and considered principles and approaches to address these issues as part of obesity prevention and treatment efforts. Speaker presentations addressed three areas: current policies and practices that either perpetuate health inequities or advance health equity; mechanisms to support community-driven solutions that can influence the social determinants of health; and approaches for fostering multisector collaboration to address disparities by exploring the issues related to the creation, implementation, and evaluation of equity-oriented programs, policies, and systems changes. Participants also discussed research needs to inform and mobilize equity-centered obesity prevention and treatment actions.

This Proceedings of a Workshop—in Brief highlights the presentations and discussions that occurred at the workshop and is not intended to provide a comprehensive summary of information shared during the workshop. The information summarized reflects the knowledge and opinions of individual workshop participants and should not be seen as a consensus of the workshop participants, the Roundtable on Obesity Solutions, or the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

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The Roundtable on Obesity Solutions, Health and Medicine Division, National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a one-day public workshop that examined the status of the global obesity pandemic and explored approaches aimed at managing the problem in different settings around the world. This Proceedings of a Workshop highlights presentations that discussed the importance of understanding obesity in a global context and shared perspectives on the implications for prevention and treatment efforts in the United States, with an emphasis on reducing disparities.

To learn more, click here.

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The American Fitness Index, published by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) and the Anthem Foundation, was released this week. The ACSM/Anthem Fitness Index evaluates America’s 100 largest cities using 33 health behaviors, chronic diseases and community infrastructure indicators. The American Fitness Index is used as an assessment and evaluation tool to educate community leaders on the importance of key indicators of physical activity. Access the report here.

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In 2016, youth e-cigarette use was substantially higher than cigarette smoking or use of any other tobacco product. The Center for Tobacco Products of the Food and Drug Administration requested that the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convene a committee of experts to conduct a review the available evidence of the health effects related to the use of e-cigarettes and identify future federally funded research needs. The resulting report is a comprehensive and systematic review of the literature that evaluates the evidence about e-cigarettes and health, highlights gaps that are a priority for future research, and makes recommendations to improve the quality of this research.

Access the report here.

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Sustainability in the context of diet is not a new issue. The challenge is how to turn today’s more complex, nuanced definition of sustainability into a feasible reality.

This particularly difficult for those living in low- and middle-income contexts and in countries where tremendous inequalities force policy makers to make difficult decisions about what to prioritize. The rapid demographic transition underway worldwide, with increasing wealth, urbanization, and other factors driving a growing demand for meat also contributes to the challenge of sustainability.

Click here to read more in a report of the proceedings from the 2018 Food Forum of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

 

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Obesity and overweight pose significant challenges to the armed forces in the United States, affecting service members (including active duty, guard, and reserve components), veterans, retirees, and their families and communities. The consequences of obesity and overweight in the armed forces influence various aspects of their operations that are critical to national security, including recruitment, retention, resilience, readiness, and retirement.

This resource examines how obesity and overweight are measured in the armed forces and how they affect recruitment, retention, resilience, and readiness; discussed service-specific issues related to these problems and highlighted innovative strategies to address them through improved nutrition, physical activity, and stress management; and offered perspectives from outside of the armed forces on approaches to prevent and treat obesity. It also discusses the challenges and opportunities related to overcoming the concerns posed by obesity and overweight in the armed forces, military families, and their communities, including potential cross-sector opportunities.

Click here to read the publication for free.

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